328 Discover The Secret Behind Magical Success; Sylvia Becker-Hill

June 7, 2018

Sylvia Becker-Hill is an industry expert in the field of corporate leadership and international speaking. She is the author of '12 Leadership Powers for Successful Women'. Sylvia has experienced first-hand, the rise of women’s empowerment. Sylvia fuses her love of science and psychology to help people break through their un-serving dogmas of the past. Her mission is to raise the number of female leaders world-wide in all sections of society, economy and government by 30% in the next 30 years.

Contact Info

Most Influential Person

  • My husband, Peter Hill.

Effect on Emotions

  • Mindfulness helps me to stay out of emotional drama and enjoy the beauty of real emotions.

Thoughts on Breathing

  • Breathing is my most easiest, most powerful tool. By just taking a deep breath, I raise already my level of mindfulness.

Suggested Resources

Bullying Story

  • For my own experience, let me say that I had. I had in the past quite a short fuse. Is that an expression which makes sense for English speakers, so when I watched something which was against my values, some injustice, unfairness, it's at school or in business, oh my gosh. That triggered me and being German, I'm straightforward in my communication.
  • So I had the tendency in the past to explode and say what I think and be quite straight and intense and sometimes to a degree which was hurting the other person.
  • It sometimes went over the top and was not appropriate for the situation. There's a difference between stepping up when you see injustice and mentioning it and addressing it or leaching out because you feel subconsciously attacked in your own value system.
  • So there's these two layers of appropriate addressing. Plus because my ego was still attached to my values, being here to act and threaten where my ego was reacting. So mindfulness gave me the tool to be able to even distinguish what I just shared with you.
  • That there are two layers that, that it's not about not saying anything, it's about having the clarity and the confidence to address things which are not okay, but in a way which are productive and not coming from an own hurt ego reaction pattern where I'm protecting more my own values or whatever I'm feeling attacked.
  • Maybe it's an argument, maybe it's a belief system. So mindfulness helps me to distinguish that. I was able to discover that and mindfulness helped me to train, to let go of the ego hurt reaction where I'm defending where I'm attacking the other person because I feel threatened and focus really on the productive part of the interaction.
  • So mindfulness I think makes me a better person where this short fuse; it's now a very long fuse, so it needs now much more to trigger me that I lose control.
  • So mindfulness ultimately gave me more control about the animal parts of me, the ego part, the subconscious mind parts, the parts where in the past I might have gone out of control in a painful way for others and myself.
00:0000:00

327 Whale Watching Wisdom with Anne Gordon de Barrigon

June 4, 2018

Anne Gordon de Barrigon is a whale and dolphin expert. She has been running Whale and Dolphin Wisdom Retreats since 2007 and has a Degree in Biology and Animal Behavior.  She has worked as a zookeeper and has trained animals for over 20 years for movies and TV. Married into the indigenous Embera tribe in Panama. Owns and operates Embera Village Tours. Pioneered the whale watching industry in Panama.

Contact Info

  • Website: www.WhaleWisdomRetreats.com
  • Free Ebook: You can download 'Messages From the Sea', which is wisdom that I received direct from the dolphins and whales. I'm happy to share that with you. (Get it from her website)

Most Influential Person

  • I think that would be the whales and dolphins. For me, they're, they're my gurus.

Effect on Emotions

  • Mindfulness has given me a deep sense of peace, a deep peace and comfort.

Thoughts on Breathing

  • Breathing is really important because dolphins and whales are conscious breathers. Dolphins and whales have to literally consciously think to breathe.
  • That means, let's just say you're swimming underwater and you know you can't breathe until you come to the surface. Same with them. So when you are conscious breather for a whale and dolphin, they can't sleep like we can.
  • We sleep because they they'd suffocate without breathing so they sleep with one half of their brain and the other half keeps them moving and breathing or you know, coming to the surface.
  • So when you are fully conscious of your breathing, it also, that just expands to being more conscious and using more of your brain power or conscious of how your physical body moves, which also opens up your mind to being more aware and conscious of the world around you.

Suggested Resources

Bullying Story

  • I'm not aware of being bullied or just didn't pay enough attention so that it affected me. I have an interesting story that I think you'll like.
  • It was on a retreat here with the whales and I had these people on this trip who were all from the UK. This one young man, he was just 21 and he was so much fun, but he was hyper as all get out. He was just bouncing off the walls.
  • This was not even a spiritual group. They were more of a whale-watching scientific group. Somebody in the group asked, can we do some meditation? I'm like, sure. Okay. So when we went to do the first meditation, this young man said, I don't know if I can do this meditation stuff. I can't sit still for anything.
  • And I said, you know what? That's fine. It's up to you and if you want to just try it and if it doesn't work, just very quietly walk away so you don't disturb anybody. So he was like, okay. So I gave him permission to leave if he needed to.
  • So I started the meditation and when I oftentimes lead meditations, I have an idea of where it's going, but the whales and dolphins enter and they guide me and I just go wherever they want to take us. So on that particular evening they wanted to take us to forgiveness.
  • So okay. We went there and what they asked me to show was to have everybody imagine a dolphin hunter from Japan standing in front of them and then feel what they feel about a dolphin hunter, but then see that this man, this hunter has a family and he has his culture and he has his history and he's just trying to do what we're all trying to do and that's feed his family and live a good life, good healthy, happy life.
  • And that's all he knows how to do; to connect with him on a heart to heart level and a soul to soul level. And then I guided them to hug this man once they connected heart to heart, soul to soul. So afterwards, I was asking for anybody to share and this young man said that was amazing. He said, I saw that Japanese hunter and I punched him.
  • But then when you asked me to look at his heart and his soul and see that he was just trying to get by. I hugged him and I apologized. I'm so sorry that I hit him. And so for me, bullying is about like he was trying to bully this Japanese hunter.
  • If we just open our hearts and our, our souls to connect on that level because the people doing the bullying are doing so out of pain that they're feeling. And so they don't know how else to act out. So we need to open our hearts and move to understand them and give them the love they're so desperately seeking.
00:0000:00

326 Fast Track Your Acting Career With Valorie Hubbard

May 31, 2018

Valorie Hubbard is an actor and an expert at empowering other actors. She owns the company, Actor’s Fast Track, where she consults with working actors about their career paths. In her newest book, 'Rule Breakers - Changing The Way Actors Do Business', she shows professional actors how to create and operate their acting career as a successful business – and how to move from being “stuck” into the limelight. Some of her credits include: Castle, Agent’s of S.H.I.E.L.D; How I Met Your Mother; Glee; American Horror Story; Workaholics; True Blood, Resident Evil: Extinction and every Disney show. Valorie lives in Los Angeles with her husband Chef Gill Boyd and dog Gracie.

Contact Info

  • Company: Actors Fast Track
  • Website: www.ActorsFastTrack.com
  • Contact: Sara@actorsfasttrack.com will arrange a conversation for you with the right person.
  • Free Book: Text the word 'Rulebreakers' to 38470 to get a free digital download of the book, Rulebreakers by Valorie Hubbard.

Most Influential Person

  • Melissa McFarland, who was my original coach in Actor's Fast Track. She was my coach for 10 years.

Effect on Emotions

  • Mindfulness has calmed my rage down. If I take that five seconds before I make a decision; discernment.

Thoughts on Breathing

  • Breathing is everything. I mean, you learn that as an actor and so breathing is everything. Everything. It's life, so huge. It's a huge impact.

Suggested Resources

Bullying Story

  • Well, that's hilarious because really my tagline as an actor, is the adorable bully. Marcy Lewis is the bully. You know, like I've always played the bully. So it's so funny. I've always played that person.
  • When I was little I was teased a lot for being fat. And one of the things that I didn't know and I wasn't taught is, I think breath would have been a very big help. I mean, that's something they didn't know when I was a child, about breathing in and breathing out and breathing in and breathing out. And that time out and that five second rule, that discernment thing, you know, is really big.
  • What happened is, the kid started teasing my friend one day and because it was my friend, all of a sudden I just lost it. Like I snapped and I've had a few of those where I beat him up. He never came back to school. The girl beat him up. The fat girl beat him up.
  • I socked him hard in his face, you know. The lesson always is if you don't say something, if you don't have the conversation, if you don't face and say the truth of what you're feeling regardless of how they take it or whatever, it's like it'll build up to where you explode and possibly injure someone.
  • I mean there were times in my adult life where I, you know, early adult life where I experienced that and I was like, I do not want to experience that again.
00:0000:00

325 Be a Little Crazy Says Storyteller Devin Galaudet

May 28, 2018

Devin Galaudet is editor-in-chief of 'In The Know Traveler' and he's visited 85 coutries around the world. He's in the process of marrying his wife 100 times in 100 countries. He's accomplished 20 times in 15 countries so far. He's appeared on Fox, NBC, ReInvention Radio among others. His writing has appeared in the Huffington Post, TravelAge West, Citron Review, Skylight Magazine. Devin has written a memoir called, Ten Thousand Miles With My Dead Father's Ashes, available in bookstore in September, 2018. It answers the question, what do you do when you lose your father's ashes?

Contact Info

Most Influential Person

  • Anna Korea King (A woman I studied the Western Mysteries with)

Effect on Emotions

  • I can't begin to tell you how important mindfulness is towards my day to day life and I think it comes in a variety of forms in religion and spirituality and philosophy and all kinds of different doctrines and things like that.
  • I think what it's given me is to kind of look beyond how I might be feeling in any given moment to understand that I am part of this great fantastic thing called life and I get to appreciate that thing.
  • Again, some moments and some days are more difficult than others. But overall I'm, I'm the luckiest guy in the world. I think getting started, it is very challenging because we want to fall back on old ideas.
  • I was raised in a certain way so I keep thinking, well I'm that guy and the truth of the matter is I'm not that guy anymore and I haven't been that guy for many years.
  • So having that gratitude, you stay on the wheel, so to speak.
  • You keep working on yourself and remaining conscious. The more that happens, all these other doors start opening up. I started developing more gratitude and more compassion for other people.

Thoughts on Breathing

  • Well, I think there's a physiological thing that goes on when we get bad news or we're agitated and that becomes more shallow breaths. That becomes less awareness.
  • I think there are just things that go on. And the first thing that I do is try to almost automatically go into a slower breath. I want to fill my lungs up just to either breathe in this good news or just acknowledge it.
  • Okay, here's this thing that's going on, but I don't need to be flipped out by it. So why don't I just take long, slow breaths?

Suggested Resources

Bullying Story

  • Yes, I was bullied when I was six or seven years old. And you know, it's hard to describe. Again, this is something that comes from the book.
  • My mother thought that I was a Barbie doll and so she would quite literally dress me in pantaloons and ruffled shirts and buckled shoes and I grew up in like nineteen seventies, Los Angeles. And that is a recipe for getting picked on.
  • As I recall, every boy was wearing like sears, tough skin jeans and everybody was wearing work boots and you know, I mean that's the way my father dressed and that's what I wanted. And so I would get dressed up in these costumes that were, it was, I mean, again, you can look back and you smile at it, but at the time it was just demoralizing.
  • I would go, who wears velvet knickers, like other than like somebody from a French Dandy from the seventeen hundreds. But I was. I don't even know where my mother found culottes for boys, but that's how I was sent to school.
  • And so that without question separated me from most kids and I took some lumps over that and you know, again, I don't know if it's ironic, but once my father got wind of it and my father was a pretty prideful guy and I was kind of a slight built guy and my father was just a wide shoulder, big forearms, the whole thing.
  • And he was very much like, you know, I want to transmit my father and use his language, but that would probably be inappropriate for a family audience. But he made it essentially very clear that you are going to stand up for yourself, you are getting into fistfights wherever necessary.
  • And he took me in the backyard and taught me to do things that really were probably on the edge of right and wrong. But looking back at it, it was something that I think for me as a young man, certainly considering the time, that was just part of what needed to take place.
00:0000:00

324 Finding Peace From Your Hijackal Relationships; Dr. Rhoberta Shaler

May 24, 2018

Dr. Rhoberta Shaler is the 'Relationship Help Doctor'. She provides urgent and on-going care for relationships in crisis. She particularly helps the partners, the exes, adult children, and co-workers of the crazy-making, relentlessly difficult people that she calls, 'Hijackals'. She helps them save their sanity and stop the crazy-making. Even the United States Marines have called on Doctor Shaler for help. She's a relationship expert and speaker and author of 16 books. She consults with clents world-wide through the internet and she's host of two podcasts. One is called 'Emotional Savvy: The Relationship Help Show' and the other podcast is called 'Save Your Sanity: Help For Handling Hijackals'.

Contact Info

Most Influential Person

  • Joel Goldsmith (Author)

Effect on Emotions

  • I think mindfulness levels your emotions. It doesn't take out the peaks and valleys, but you understand that you choose the state that you stay in.

Thoughts on Breathing

  • Well, I think it's key to everything. When you stop and you allow yourself to let your shoulders down from your ear lobes, you take a deep breath and you open your chest and you open your heart at the same time.
  • Then when you allow yourself to take a deep breath, it takes 20 seconds for the oxygen and a deep breath to go all the way around your blood system.
  • So you refresh yourself completely. So when you are using your breath, you are actually regenerating yourself and when you do that it calms you and helps you think more clearly.

Suggested Resources

Bullying Story

  • I was in the education world for a long time as a teacher and then I became a school administrator and it was at a time that really stands out for me.
  • When I had the opportunity, I was given an entire extra classroom to do what I wanted. So every morning I would have all the children including all the special needs children sit in a big circle and I invited their parents to come and spend that first 20 minutes of the day with us.
  • And why I did that was there was a lot of unrest. There was a lot of children who were difficult and a lot of special needs children. And there were of course bullies in the mix.
  • And so if we're all participating in something, it became something that everybody then said, okay, to. There were not any people who were not doing it.
  • And what we saw during that time where we would just sit quietly, maybe we'd play with energy a little bit, you know, we'd rub our hands together and make energy, go round the circle or we'd do a visualization or whatever.
  • We saw a real change and then I had an opportunity to be the administrator of a school for at risk teenagers. And of course there was a lot of this going on, you know, make them do this and all that when I got there.
  • And I know that's not the way it's going to work, we're going to feed them.
  • And so, we made a huge change. These kids who were going out and stealing cars and doing home invasions on the weekends; through love and sitting quietly, they changed.
  • From the time that I went there to work, Bruce, the average length of time a child was staying in the school was three months.
  • By the time I left five years later, we had not had a vacancy for 18 months.
00:0000:00

323 The Mindfulness Solution To Addiction With Expert Jeff Jones

May 21, 2018

Jeff Jones is a therapist, addiction counsellor, interventionist, and now, family recovery coach working online with families with addiction. He’s expanded the context of addiction and created a three-phase program that empowers families to safeguard their loved one in an addictive cycle or recovery, while they engage in a process to stop the addiction cycle in this generation. After putting it online and wrapping a user-friendly online community around it, Jeff is moving towards his goal of empowering families to connect with like-minded others, family-specific resources and expertise when they are ready.

Contact Info

Most Influential Person

  • Thich Nhat Hanh

Effect on Emotions

  • So what I'm aware of is that my emotions can like go to extremes, whether it's spiraled downwards or climb upwards kind of thing.
  • And mindfulness for me has been a very helpful antidote to ground me in reality as opposed to right away believe any extreme, whether it's down or up. So I want to reality check it with mindfulness.

Thoughts on Breathing

  • When I take slow, deep breaths into my belly and actually push my belly out, it engages my parasympathetic nervous system which slows the body down, which slows the nervous system down, calms the nervous system.
  • I have been using that in meditation. A natural thing that I do is, right away, take a big breath even sometimes before thinking. It has taken a long time to get there.
  • The slow deep breath is always there. It's a resource that will never leave me.

Suggested Resources

Bullying Story

  • The story that I'm thinking of happened really not that long ago, just a couple months ago. It is interesting how it started out because I have a number of different, addiction mentors.
  • There was one in particular that I had just sent her an email kind of with a compliment of what I learned from her and I was just at a place where I was looking at what I was doing and having appreciation for the different people who I have learned from whose shoulders I'm standing on kind of thing.
  • So I wrote her an email and what I got back from her was a letter from her attorney. So it was confusing to me and I felt bullied by that. It was a great opportunity for me to be aware of what was going on in my own thinking process.
  • I just couldn't really make sense of my giving her a compliment about something I had learned from her and then getting this letter from her attorney.
  • It was kind of like letting me know how to cite her reference properly, like I was stealing some of her information or something.
  • I called her and I sent an email and I said, hey, I got this email from your attorney and like, can we just have a conversation?
  • Which you know, I got another letter from her attorney and just a couple of weeks ago I was at a conference and I saw her and she was sweet as pie to me. Nothing was said about it. So in that situation I felt like I was being bullied.
  • I was aware of what was going on in my mind and painting all these pictures like I'm being bullied here, and then to see her and get no message of that, it was confusing to me, but what I really learned from that from a mindfulness perspective is how I really need to check out my own thinking.
  • Like I can't always believe my own thinking. And if I don't check it out with the other person, it's not really going to be helpful for me to believe everything that my mind says. Now the other side of it is I do feel that I was being bullied.
00:0000:00

322 Leave A Legacy By Being Mindful Says Speaker/Author Thom Singer

May 17, 2018

Tom Singer is a professional master of ceremonies and keynote speaker for corporate, law firms, and convention audiences. He's also authored 12 books on the power of business relationships, sales, networking, presentation skills, and entrepreneurship. Tom is also the host of the Cool Things Entrepreneurs Do podcast where he interviews business leaders who possess an extra dose of the entrepreneurial spirit. Stories from Tom's interviews are shared with his clients and he challenges people to be more engaged and enthusiastic in all of their actions.

Contact Info

Most Influential Person

  • My father. My dad was 52 years old when I was born. So in a lot of ways it was like being raised by a grandfather. He had three sons who, when I was born were 10, 12 and 14. And by the way, I had the same set of parents. I was sort of a surprise. My Dad always told everybody that a surprise was an accident that worked out really well because he liked me.

Effect on Emotions

  • I think that As I've gone into this whole 50 to 75 plan that I'm shepherding, I think that being mindful of experiences and of saying yes to things, of not getting stressed, of not getting pissed, of just doing all that, I think the emotion that it has triggered more than anything else is joy.
  • I think because I am mindful, that I'm going to have a good time.
  • I think it has unleashed that emotion of joy and I think my wife sees it. I think my kids see it. I think my friends see it. I think my clients see it, so I think that's how mindfulness has affected my emotions.

Thoughts on Breathing

  • I don't think that [mindfulness has affected my breathing] other than the fact that it brings oxygen into my lungs that then goes into my blood and goes to my brain.
  • So when I first started running and I couldn't run a mile and I hired my friend who was a runner to kind of coach me through it. He actually pushed me too hard and I triggered asthma that I hadn't had in years.
  • I almost had to go to the hospital. I certainly hadn't used an inhaler in forever. I had to go to the doctor and everything else. So I was mindful of breathing when I couldn't.
  • But the rest of the time, for some reason, once I got up to where I was running three to five miles and then five to 10 miles throughout the training, I rarely am that winded.

Suggested Resources

Bullying Story

  • You know, I'm just going to be real honest. I have one situation that comes to mind when you asked that question that involve bullying and I'm just going to put it out there.
  • I was kind of the bully and I was probably 12 years old and a bunch of people were sort of mocking, you know, a kid who kind of didn't fit in and I was part of it.
  • And what's interesting is it's not part of my personality, it's not part of who I am. It's not part of who I was at the time and if I had been mindful of not having to be part of that group or whatever, I wouldn't have been part of it. I don't keep in touch with this person.
  • I don't know if it was scarring or if it was just a minor thing, but I've always felt really bad about that. And because of that I've always been really conscious of not falling into that mob mentality and not being surprised by bystander mentality.
  • Again, I wasn't leading the whole thing. I wasn't the bully, but I was part of the group and I mean at the time I knew it was wrong and I don't know why it came to mind when you asked about it, but now I feel kind of like crap for even having been a part of it, just thinking about it again.
  • But I do know that it stayed with me to the point that I never did anything like that again, at least not to that level that I'm aware of.

Quote

"When you are mindful of your purpose in any conversation, you leave a legacy." Thom Singer

00:0000:00

321 Staying Mindful In A World Of Technology With Robert Plotkin

May 14, 2018

Robert Plotkin is an engineer, mindfulness practitioner, and the founder of Technology for Mindfulness. His background in computer science and engineering dates back over thirty years to his days programming an Atari 800 personal computer, through a degree in Computer Science and Engineering at MIT, and nearly two decades as a patent attorney specializing in patent protection for computer technology. His relationship to Zen Buddhism stems primarily from his study of Japanese martial arts for more than three decades. He is a graduate of the Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program at the Center for Mindfulness and practices mindfulness meditation. His fascination with the relationship and interactions between computer technology and the mind is reflected in his book on the automation of creativity in the field of inventing, The Genie in the Machine: How Computer-Automated Inventing is Revolutionizing Law and Business (Stanford, 2009).

Contact Info

Most Influential Person

Effect on Emotions

  • Mindfulness has changed the way I deal with my emotions. This is where I think the stillness aspect of mindfulness is really helpful.
  • I talked a lot earlier about action and martial arts, in doing that you engage a lot of action, movement of the body.
  • I think for me, sitting meditation has been very helpful in dealing with emotions. Not just being able to notice what they are, but accept that they're there. Before I did sitting meditation, I engaged in a lot of trying to change difficult or negative emotions.
  • For me, sitting meditation has really, really been helpful. When you say dealing with emotion, just being able to be more aware of what they actually are at any given moment, being able to accept them and notice them without being able to change them.
  • I'm sure you know from your own mindfulness practice, sometimes that results in them lingering for awhile and sometimes I found that paying attention to them or even diving into them can result in them dissipating or changing in some way.
  • I'm always working on accepting in advance that whatever the outcome is, it is.

Thoughts on Breathing

  • Breathing is a very, very big part of my mindfulness practice. Always has been.
  • Even from the martial arts training; breathing really fairly fundamental and it's been interesting for me to do sitting meditation.
  • Certainly there are some similarities and differences between how I think breath is approached in the two. In my experience in martial arts training, we do pay attention to the breath.
  • If I can paint it in broad strokes, there is more of a goal or pragmatic aspect to working on and somewhat improving the breath.
  • We work on deepening it, we work on being able to maintain it as more of an even keel. We work on being able to breathe more deeply. Part of it is to develop physical power.
  • There is a pragmatic goal, so to speak, at least as part of the martial arts training and the breath. And so it's definitely been interesting to me to come at the breath and sitting meditation from a different perspective.
  • Although sometimes when I'm doing sitting meditation I will form the intention of both noticing the breath and if I notice that it's shallow, I will relax.
  • But I also some of the time, will merely notice what it is without trying to change it. That's been a different experience for me. Certainly in martial arts training, we often say that it begins and ends with the breath. I think for all the same reasons, I mean breath is the foundation of life.
  • Everything else stops when you're not breathing. And so, that's always been a really significant part, and I do return to the breath.
  • In fact, I did just go back to a meditation teacher who I really rely on for a lot of guidance and was asking her about focusing on the breath and how I hear a lot of instruction these days that seem to imply to me that we should always return to the breath.
  • I've found that in my own practice, I'm at a point where sometimes if I'm experiencing and aware of a difficult emotion that returning to the breath can feel like a distraction.

Suggested Resources

00:0000:00

320 A Story of Abduction and Finding Strength Through Mindfulness; Author Marie White

May 10, 2018

Marie White is an entrepreneur, a world traveler, a missionary, and a YouTube host with over half a million viewers. She is the owner of Zamiz Press, which is an inspirational publishing company that offers hope and encouragement to people the world over who are experiencing struggles. Marie is also the author of five books, including the award-winning #1 bestseller, Strength for Parents of Missing Children: Surviving Divorce, Abduction, Runaways and Foster Care. Marie has also lived trauma first-hand, being the mother of an abducted child who remains missing.

Contact Info

Most Influential Person

Effect on Emotions

  • Mindfulness has helped to keep me from going from one extreme to the other.

Thoughts on Breathing

  • Breathing is really helpful if you want to live. It’s necessary to bring down your emotions when you are in a heightened state of stress.

  • I like to breathe in through the nose, out through the mouth, very slow, taking a moment to concentrate.

Suggested Resources

00:0000:00

319 Make Boundaries Your Breakthrough; Breakfast Leadership Host, Michael Levitt

May 7, 2018
Michael Levitt is all about boundaries. He is the founder of Breakfast Leadership.com where he shares his expertise on boundaries with other leaders. Michael also works in the health-care field and has experienced first-hand how important it is to have a grip on boundaries in life and death situations as well as daily living. Michael is trained in crisis intervention from the Canadian Training Institute. Michael is recognized as a healthcare leader, holding the Advanced Healthcare System Leadership certificate from Rotman School of Management, one of the World’s highly ranked business schools, as part of the University of Toronto. Michael also shares his knowledge on his podcast – Breakfast Leadership.

Contact Info

Most Influential Person

Effect on Emotions

  • Mindfulness has helped me keep my emotions in check. I'm passionate. I'm in healthcare. I'm passionate about people taking better care of themselves.
  • I'm passionate about the healthcare sector and what it needs to do to better serve the entire community and not just pockets of it.
  • I'm very passionate about wrongs that we see in society, but I keep them in check now because I know that I can only do so much. I can do what I can do and I have to let others do what they can do.

Thoughts on Breathing

  • Breathing is extremely important to me. I am an asthmatic so my breaths are a little bit more challenging than others. It's mild, [my asthma], but it's something that I know could progress into copd (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) down the road. And for me, I take care of my breathing very carefully.
  • I focus on it when things are tense, I pause and I go, OK, what are my breathing patterns like? And I can take a deep breath and sometimes I'll do the nostril thing where you do a closed nostril breathing.
  • I just really focus on the breathing and it lowers my blood pressure and it just puts me into a moment of awareness and in the moment of now. Instead of worrying about what's going to happen or freaking out about what happened before, it's a good way to really get me connected to where I am right at this moment.

Suggested Resources

  • Book: 369 Days: How To Survive A Year of Worst Case Scenarios by Michael Levitt
  • Book: The Tortoise And The Hare by  Jerry Pinkney - This is a leadership book. Some people will question me saying that, but it also helps with mindfulness too, as far as focusing on what's important. From a leadership book standpoint, it's a great book because oftentimes we are the rabbit and we're running around trying to get things done and moving things around where the tortoise is just steady as we go. Let's get through this. It's the same thing from a mindfulness standpoint. Our brains and minds and activities are all over the place where the turtle's step, step, step, step, step, step and turtle wins the race. I want all of us to win the race. So it's one of those books that I will read from time to time to really reconnect with myself.
  • App: Calm
00:0000:00